Campus Caravan

“We created this vacuum, by not paying attention to what was happening in Iraq or what happened in Syria with the extremists who were developing base of operations there, and this is what produced the ISIS we’re confronting today”, said former US Defence Secretary of State, Leon Panetta.   
If one were to trace the source of this vacuum, it wouldn’t take long to realise that the instability in the Middle-East, specifically in the region of Iraq is a result of the so called “war on terror”, initiated by the Bush regime in the aftermath of 9/11 attacks. Strangely however, none of the perpetrators of the attacks were from Iraq, nor had any known affiliations from it. A Chilcot report revealed that intelligence on weapons of mass destruction was exaggerated to justify going to war in Iraq, a war that was fought by the US, UK, Poland and Australia. 
This is a case in point, a similar trend can be observed in many such cases, where external intervention had taken place in a country, the regime wash pushed out, and the country fell in turmoil, spiralling it into a much worse situation than before. The basic argument being, that no external body/country will intervene in a nation without having something to gain from it. A CNN article points out how “Before the 2003 invasion, Iraq’s domestic oil industry was fully nationalised and closed to Western Oil companies. A decade of war later, it is largely privatised and utterly dominated by foreign firms”. This is not to say intervention cannot be instrumental in restoring ‘peace’ in a region, it simply means that there is no neutral party to make sure that it happens with the sole benefit of the recipient in mind.

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